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Barking dogs are a menace

by admin on 04/12/2018

Have you ever had thefeeling that you want to throttle your neighbour?
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Surely the most common reason for such a heinous, uncivil thought is barking dogs.

Picture this: It’s the weekend. After a long, hard week at work, you find a few spare moments to sit in the garden. It’s a blue sky. The sun is shining. A cold beer is at hand. Or perhaps a cup of tea. There’s no lawnmowers to be heard. The tradesmen who’d been making a racket through the week have mercifully departed.

The kids of the neighbourhood are out playing sport. Or maybe they’re trapped in digital mania. Wherever they are, they can’t be heard screaming, whining or crying.It’s quiet. But just as you sit down in your reclining chair, it starts.

It could be the yap-yap next door. Or the beastly, guttural roar of the German shepherd over the back. It might be the dogs cruelly locked in cages across the road, whosemain purpose seems to be pumping out puppies for profit.

It’s enough to drive you back inside.But then sometimes the piercing sound of a barking dog travels through walls.Sometimes it penetrates skulls, sending people barking mad.

Have you ever noticed that cacophony of barks that sometimes occurs in the neighbourhood? It’s like a barking chorus. It’s like the dogs have joined together in a loud and obnoxious conversation about what they’ve just had to eat or who’s the toughest.

Then there’s the jealous bark. This never fails to happen when an owner walks adog past other dogs perennially stuck behind fences.

The odd barkfest is a pain in the backside, but it’s not the end of the world. Sometimes dogs bark.It’snuisance barkingthat can test the patience of the most zen-like humans.That is, dogs that bark often.

What’s going on with the owners of these dogs? They seem to be letting the dogs bark. Aren’t they bothered themselves by the barking? Or have they become immune to it –like those people who live near railway lines?

They might yell “shut up Spot” or “Fido, stop it” every now and then. Funnily enough, this doesn’t seem to have much effect.Perhaps these people tried to stop their dog barking, buthad no luck. So they just gave up.

Some councils have stated that barking dogs create more disputes between neighbours than any other issue, and result in a large number of complaints to council every year.

In February this year, a dispute about barking dogs led to a man being shot in the chest in Victoria.In 2005, a barking dog was poisoned to death in San Jose, California. The owner received a note on her gate, which said: “Your dog was barking. If you don’t do something about it, I will”.

Like I said, barking dogs make people mad.So why do dogs bark?

For instance, Newcastle council’s website says: “Barking is simply one way dogs communicate and can mean anything from playfulness to danger”.

The council says some reasons for dogs barking are: Being chained to a fixed point and not having enough room to move around; being deliberately or unintentionally provoked by people or other roaming animals; not being properly trained; being lonely, sick, hungry or generally neglected and not getting enough exercise.

Now there’s an idea. How about taking your dog for a walk every day?

Newcastle’s clash with Dragons a trial for captain’s review systempoll

by admin on 04/12/2018

NEWCASTLE’S dead-rubber game against St George Illawarra at Kogarah Oval on Saturday will becomea historic occasionin which a“captain’s challenge” system will be trialledin the NRL for the first time.
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POINT OF CONTENTION: Knights skipper Trent Hodkinson and referee Gavin Badger debate a decision earlier in the season. Picture: Getty Images

Neither the Knights, who are distant wooden spooners, nor the Dragons can make the finals, so NRL officials decided it was an opportune time to experiment.

If it receives widespread approval, the NRL will consider introducing it for all games next season.

Similar referral processes have been used in international cricket, tennis and hockey for years.

Under the experimentalrules, each captain will be allowed to challenge refereeing decisions relatingto tries only.

The referees will be required to make a decision on the field, and it will be reviewed by the bunker only if a challenge is made.

Each team will be allowed one challenge per half, which isretained if it is upheld upon review.

Hence, until a challenge is overruled, a captain theoretically has unlimited opportunities to query try-scoring decisions.An additional challenge will be allowed for each team in the final fiveminutes of the game and in golden-point extra time.

Knights chief executive Matt Gidley said his club welcomed the chance to be involved in the test case, adding optimistically: “We don’t plan on conceding any tries this weekend, so hopefully we won’t need any reviews.’’

The referees in charge of handling the landmark trial will beHenry Perenara andMatt Noyen.

NRL chief executive Todd Greenberg insisted no decision had been made with regards to introducing the system for the long term.

“If it’s successful, we will look at it to maybe put into the game next year,” Greenberg said.

“I’m not saying it’s definitely coming through but we’re very hopeful of the concept …the bunker gives us the opportunity to trial the captain’s challenge with state-of-the-art technology to help determine whether a try has been scored.

“We will assess the trial to determine if there is scope to use the captain’s challenge more widely in the future.”

The initiative will be also used duringthe National Youth Competition (under-20) play-offs.

“We trialled this in the 20s for a number of years but we didn’t have the technology to support it,” Greenberg said.

“Now we have the technology to use.We’ve been working on this quietly for a couple of months and we’re ready to trial it.’’

In Saturday’s game, the video-review bunker will continue to be used for 40/20 rulings, goal-line drop-outs and 20-metre restarts, reportable foul play, double knock-on rulings and to determine which team touched the ball last before going over the touchline.

Warning: don’t post photos of your tickets on social media

by admin on 04/12/2018

Cheaper tickets are selling on Gumtree. Photo: GumtreeAs the AFL and NRL finals seasons approach, Ticketmaster has issued a reminder to excited social media users not to post full images of their tickets online.
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“In recent times, there has been an increase in fraudulent behaviour whereby people browse the internet and social media sites looking for ticket barcodes that can be copied and resold”, the ticket-seller warned in a blog post.

“It is unfortunate that a simple and innocent Facebook post can lead to major problems, but in the interest of protecting live event fans we need to send a strong message about online safety”.

The warning comes as tickets to next week’s AFL match between West Coast and the Western Bulldogs have begun to appear on online auction sites. Tickets to the sold-out game have appeared on Ticketmaster’s official resale site at inflated prices, in one case for almost six times the original value, making the tickets on eBay and Gumtree all the more attractive.

Although copied tickets recreated from an image of a barcode would be unlikely to hold up to close scrutiny, it’s conceivable that one could be sold and allow its holder entry to the event, meaning the original purchaser would be denied.

AFL General Manager Darren Birch said fans that did not buy their tickets through official channels were taking a risk, even if the ticket turned out to be genuine.

“If they do not purchase their tickets through an official agent then there is no guarantee that they will get what they pay for or that they will get entry to the game,” Birch said.

“Where the tickets can be identified they will be cancelled in accordance with the standard terms and conditions for entry into an AFL game.”

The dangers of posting pictures of barcodes on social media was demonstrated late last year when a punter at the Melbourne Cup backed a 100-to-1 shot, won, and posted a picture of herself with the ticket on Facebook.

By the time she took her ticket to the TAB 15 minutes later, someone she was friends with on Facebook had apparently used her photo to claim her $825 winnings from an automated machine.

Ticketmaster suggests that, if you must share pictures of your tickets on social media, you at least cover up or edit out the barcode.

Rebels invade Parliament House, no one notices

by admin on 04/12/2018

Weapons of mass distraction: They came armed – or perhaps eared – only with headphones.It’s a philosophical puzzler for the Age of Terror, the cyber-equivalent of a tree falling in the woods. If a group of eco-warriors lays siege to Parliament House but no one notices, did it really happen?
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It’s not an abstract question. It actually did happen – or did not, depending on your philosophical position – on Wednesday, as the guests at a “listening party” for the soundtrack of the controversial play Kill Climate Deniers descended on the national seat of power, right under the noses of heavily armed security staff, who either didn’t notice or didn’t care.

It was a stealth attack – so stealthy, in fact, that the organisers, playwright David Finnigan and musician Reuben Ingall, don’t know the exact size of their invading force.

“We don’t know how many were there,” says Finnigan. “All we could see were lots of people moving through the building with headphones on. Six of them joined us at the end for a cup of tea, but we’ve heard there were lots of others there too.”

The audio assault is the latest manifestation of a project that has been raising the hackles of conservatives since late 2014, when the ACT government granted almost $19,000 to the Aspen Island Theatre Company to develop the play about an attack by 96 armed eco-terrorists during a Fleetwood Mac concert in Parliament House, and the valiant resistance led by a female Environment Minister, who eventually sees them off.

The project has spawned an e-book, a live music event, a film script and, now, an album and a surreptitious listening party.

“Once we decided it didn’t have to be a stage play in the traditional sense the options began opening up,” says Finnigan. “The next step is an album of remixes.”

But the one thing it hasn’t yet spawned is an actual theatrical production. “I’d love to see it done as a play one day,” he adds wistfully.

The project – or, rather, ArtsACT’s funding of it – was first attacked by Canberra-based writer Don Aitkin on his blog in September 2014, before being picked up (almost inevitably) by Andrew Bolt the following week. (Aitkin later softened his line after learning more about the play.)

“If I were thug enough to write a play with the title Kill Climate Scientists would I get a grant,” Bolt thundered and wondered. “Would the ABC rush to present my defence?”

In an irony sure to delight him, Bolt’s words have now been appropriated as the spoken text of one of the early-’90s techno-flavoured tracks on the album.

Take that, you: Reuben Ingall stares down John Howard in Parliament House.

The outrage over the play eventually spread as far as the UK outpost of right-wing media outlet Breitbart, where the 700-plus comments on a piece railing against it included the likes of this:

“The good news is that these pussies are afraid of guns. When that day of reckoning finally comes it will be like shooting fish in a barrel.”

And this:

“Are you prepared though, to kill them before they kill us? I certainly am, and I’m devoid of remorse for doing so.”

Righteous indignation indeed.

The funny thing is, Finnigan insists the eco-terrorists are the bad guys in his work, which he describes as “a light-hearted, fun, Die Hard-esque action story” that also seeks to ask some big questions.

“What happens when the two-party political system that runs on polls and the 24-hour news cycle comes up against something as big as climate change? The tools just don’t seem fit to deal with the problem. There’s comedy in that, but there are also real questions we need to ask about what happens when there’s a need for change but a system that can’t deliver it.”

David Finnigan at the Parliament House listening party on Wednesday.

In case you’re wondering, they did get legal advice before launching their “assault” on Parliament House. After all, when there are burly staff with machineguns on the doors, you don’t want to take unnecessary risks.

“This is not in any way a protest, or a threat of any kind, but it was always going to be read as a provocation by some people,” says Finnigan.

“I think the AFP, to their credit, is aware of what is a real threat and what is not.”

Unlike, he might have added, some in the commentariat.

Follow Karl Quinn on facebook at karlquinnjournalist or on twitter @karlkwin

Why Mike Baird should not be offering himself as donations bait

by admin on 04/12/2018

Premier Mike Baird speaks to the media following release of the Operation Spicer report. Photo: Edwina PicklesWhen Premier Mike Baird faced the media following the tabling of the Independent Commission Against Corruption’s Operation Spicer report into Liberal party fundraising, one of his most important responses went largely unnoticed.
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Baird apologised on behalf of the NSW Liberal party for the findings that nine of his former colleagues had sought to evade political donations laws during the campaign to win the 2011 election.

But it was his call for further reform of political donations laws that deserved more attention.

In an effort to show he was taking the findings very seriously, Baird nominated real time, online disclosure of donations as an issue the government was working on “and close to bringing in a timetable to implement”.

The idea has a lot of merit. Instead of waiting for more than a year to learn who has donated to a political party, donations that are accepted would immediately be made public.

In non-election years this would be particularly important for the party in power, given the capacity for timely donations to influence access to government and its decision-making.

But it would be just as crucial for opposition parties in the lead up to a poll.

In its final report in December 2014, the expert panel on political donations chaired by Kerry Schott commissioned by Baird recommended the government introduce such a system “as soon as possible”.

Yet 20 months later, we are still working with what the expert panel called “an archaic paper-based disclosure system”.

The government is focused on getting a real time disclosure system in place in time for the 2019 NSW poll. But Baird, of all people, should realise why this is an unacceptable delay.

A week ago the NSW Liberal party state director Chris Stone fired off invitations to what promises to be a lavish fundraising lunch at the Westin Hotel at Martin Place.

The star attractions are Baird and Treasurer Gladys Berejiklian, but the lunch will also feature a host of cabinet ministers.

Seats are priced at a relatively modest $375 per head, but invitees are urged to inquire about “premium seating with ministers” – presumably at a significantly greater cost.

The message is clear: a larger donation can buy access to the Premier and senior ministers. The more you bid the more likely you are to get within earshot of the minister of your choice.

Baird has been busy as a donations drawcard. On August 5 he was billed as the star attraction at a fundraiser organised by Drummoyne MP John Sidoti.

Again, the standard ticket price was just $100 each on a table of 12.

But the invitation states: “Limited tickets available for ministerial tables @ $3000 per table. Premier’s Table $1000 per person.”

While all of this has and will be conducted within the existing donations laws, how much was earned and who paid will not be public information for more than a year, likely at the end of 2017.

Perhaps due to a federal election also falling due in 2019, the NSW Liberals are ramping up their state-based fundraising well ahead of time.

Viewed in this light, the delay in ushering in a real time disclosure system takes on a more sinister shade.

It’s not just the Liberals; Labor is at it as well ahead of the September 10 local government elections.

An August 22 fundraiser for Labor’s candidate to become mayor of Fairfield, Del Bennett, advertised tickets priced at $950 each.

This is strategically priced just below the $1000 threshold for mandatory public disclosure. The attendance of opposition leader Luke Foley was advertised as a drawcard.

It gives the strong impression that Labor is offering donors the opportunity to remain anonymous while still currying favour with a potential mayor.

Foley should have had nothing to do with it, given he is trying to convince the electorate he is more serious about donations reform than Baird.

Foley has committed to NSW Labor introducing its own system for real time disclosure of political donations in 2017, which he has said would make it the first Australian political party to do so.

If we are to believe his apology over Spicer is genuine, Baird needs to beat him to it and make it happen now.

Archival revival: History of the Hunter through postcardsphotos

by admin on 04/12/2018

Archival revival: Postcards of the Hunter | photos Happy New Year. Taken from Carlton Hill, 1913. G. KELLY.
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Bandon Grove Bridge.

Tunneybuc Xing. Man standing on suspension bridge over creek, 1910.

By the stream, Dungog, 1910. G. KELLY.

Stroud Hill tunnel, south end. G. KELLY.

Washpool Bridge, 1911. G. KELLY.

Goods shed cutting, Dungog, 1910. G. KELLY.

Dungog from Thalaba Road, 1913.

Gordon Paddock, Dungadee. G.KELLY.

Station site, Dungog, 1910. G. KELLY.

Bandon Grove bridge and river, 1910. G. KELLY.

Engine in Wallarobba tunnel. G. KELLY.

Concrete subway, N.C Railway. G. KELLY.

Public school, Dungog. G. KELLY.

Constructing a 24 feet arch. G. KELLY.

Bennett Bridge, Dungog. G. KELLY.

Station yard. G. KELLY.

N.C. Railway works, Dingadee.

Concreting Wallarobba tunnell. G. KELLY.

Pile driving, N.C., railway bridge, Dungog. G.KELLY.

Building railway bridge, 1911. G. KELLY.

Bands, Dowling Street, Dungog, 1911. G. KELLY.

Stroud Hill tunnel, north end, 1912. G. KELLY.

Railway opening, 1911. G. KELLY.

Dungog From Alisin’s, 1909. G.KELLY.

Dowling St. Dungog, 1908. G. Kelly.

Cooreei bridge.

Commercial bank, 1912. G. KELLY.

Church of England. G. KELLY.

Train leaving Dungog. G. KELLY.

First passenger train, 1911. G. KELLY.

Empire Day celebrations, 1909. G. Kelly.

Cooreei Bridge. G.KELLY.

Interior railway bridge, 1913. G. Kelly.

Horse racing, 1910. G. Kelly.

Empire Day celebrations, 1909. G. Kelly.

Railway bridge, Paterson. G. KELLY.

School of Arts. G Kelly.

Flour Mills, J.B. Walker, 1910. G. KELLY.

Engine shed, 1911. G. KELLY.

Military procession, 1912. G. Kelly.

Methodist Church, 1911. G. KELLY.

Postcard from Edie Kelly to Miss Gertie, 1909.

Munni Bridge, 1912. G. KELLY.

Methodist Church, 1911.G. KELLY.

Opening day Taree, 1913. G Kelly.

Postcard from Edie Kelly to Miss Gertie Alder, 1914.

Postcard from Edie Kelly to Miss Gertie Alder, 1911.

Postcard from Edie Kelly to Miss Gertie Alder, 1910.

Postcard from Edie Kelly to Miss Gertie Alder, 1912.

Postcard from Edie Kelly to Miss Gertie Alder, 1914.

Postcard from Edie Kelly to Miss Gertie Alder, 1909.

Postcard from Edie Kelly to Miss Gertie Alder, 1910.

Postcard from Edie Kelly to Miss Gertie Alder, 1911.

Postcard from Edie Kelly to Miss Gertie Alder, 1910.

Postcard from Edie Kelly to Miss Gertie, 1909.

Postcard from Edie Kelly to Miss Gertie Alder, 1913.

Postcard from Edie Kelly to Miss Gertie Alder, 1912.

Postcard from Edie Kelly to Miss Gertie Alder, 1912.

Postcard from Edie Kelly to Miss Gertie Alder, 1913.

Presbyterian Church, 1913. G. Kelly.

“Wansy’s” property about four miles from Dungog township, 1913.

River near rectory, 1914. G Kelly.

Wansy’s” property and barn with cows and horses about four miles from Dungog township, 1913.

“Wansy’s” property about four miles from Dungog township, 1913.

“Wansy’s” property about four miles from Dungog township, 1913.

Railway bridge, 1913. G. Kelly.

Smith and Tims railway contractors with employees passing through, 1909. G. Kelly.

Post Office Dungog. G. Kelly.

Public School, Dungog 1914. G. Kelly.

llustrated greeting card booklet foldout, 1928.

Hunter Street, Newcastle 1928.

General view, Ocean Beach, Newcastle, 1928.

Band rotunda, King Edward Park, Newcastle, 1928.

Gardens, King Edward Park, Newcastle, 1928.

Entrance to Harbour, Newcastle, 1928.

Church of England Cathedral, Newcastle, 1928.

Illustrated greeting card booklet foldout.

Illustrated greeting card booklet foldout.

Hunter Street, Newcastle, 1928.

Illustrated greeting card booklet foldout.

Illustrated greeting card booklet foldout.

Illustrated greeting card booklet foldout.

Illustrated greeting card booklet foldout.

Illustrated greeting card booklet foldout.

Illustrated greeting card booklet foldout.

Interior of B.H.P. rolling mill, Newcastle, 1928.

Pacific Park and General Hospital, Newcastle N.S.W., 1928.

Illustrated greeting card booklet foldout.

Ocean Beach Newcastle N.S.W, 1928.

View of B.H.P. Works, Newcastle, 1928.

Memorial Drive Newcastle, N.S.W, 1928.

Scott Street, Newcastle, N.S.W, 1928.

Nobbys and Entrance to Harbour, Newcastle, 1928.

tockton Beach, Newcastle, N.S.W, 1928.

Memorial Drive Newcastle, N.S.W, 1928.

A Bird’s Eye View – Newcastle, 1974. A portfolio of outstanding aerial photographs of Newcastle and suburbs. A Special ‘Newcastle Sun’ Reader Service.

A Bird’s Eye View – Carrington, 1974.A Bird’s Eye View: A portfolio of outstanding aerial photographs of Newcastle and suburbs. A Special ‘Newcastle Sun’ Reader Service.

A Bird’s Eye View – Stockton, 1974.A Bird’s Eye View: A portfolio of outstanding aerial photographs of Newcastle and suburbs. A Special ‘Newcastle Sun’ Reader Service.

A Bird’s Eye View – Cooks Hill, 1974.A Bird’s Eye View: A portfolio of outstanding aerial photographs of Newcastle and suburbs. A Special ‘Newcastle Sun’ Reader Service.

A Bird’s Eye View – Hamilton, 1974.A Bird’s Eye View: A portfolio of outstanding aerial photographs of Newcastle and suburbs. A Special ‘Newcastle Sun’ Reader Service.

A Bird’s Eye View – Wallsend, 1974. A Bird’s Eye View: A portfolio of outstanding aerial photographs of Newcastle and suburbs. A Special ‘Newcastle Sun’ Reader Service.

A Bird’s Eye View – Waratah, 1974. A Bird’s Eye View: A portfolio of outstanding aerial photographs of Newcastle and suburbs. A Special ‘Newcastle Sun’ Reader Service.

A Bird’s Eye View – Valentine, 1974.A Bird’s Eye View: A portfolio of outstanding aerial photographs of Newcastle and suburbs. A Special ‘Newcastle Sun’ Reader Service.

A Bird’s Eye View – Merewether, 1974. A Bird’s Eye View: A portfolio of outstanding aerial photographs of Newcastle and suburbs. A Special ‘Newcastle Sun’ Reader Service.

A Bird’s Eye View – Charlestown – Highfields, 1974. A Bird’s Eye View: A portfolio of outstanding aerial photographs of Newcastle and suburbs. A Special ‘Newcastle Sun’ Reader Service.

A Bird’s Eye View – Toronto, 1974. A Bird’s Eye View: A portfolio of outstanding aerial photographs of Newcastle and suburbs. A Special ‘Newcastle Sun’ Reader Service.

A Bird’s Eye View – Redhead, 1974. A Bird’s Eye View: A portfolio of outstanding aerial photographs of Newcastle and suburbs. A Special ‘Newcastle Sun’ Reader Service.

A Bird’s Eye View – Booragul, 1974. A Bird’s Eye View: A portfolio of outstanding aerial photographs of Newcastle and suburbs. A Special ‘Newcastle Sun’ Reader Service.

A Bird’s Eye View – Newcastle East, 1974. A Bird’s Eye View: A portfolio of outstanding aerial photographs of Newcastle and suburbs. A Special ‘Newcastle Sun’ Reader Service.

A Bird’s Eye View – Mayfield East, 1974.A Bird’s Eye View: A portfolio of outstanding aerial photographs of Newcastle and suburbs. A Special ‘Newcastle Sun’ Reader Service.

A Bird’s Eye View – Adamstown Heights, 1974.A Bird’s Eye View: A portfolio of outstanding aerial photographs of Newcastle and suburbs. A Special ‘Newcastle Sun’ Reader Service.

A Bird’s Eye View – Belmont. 1974.A Bird’s Eye View: A portfolio of outstanding aerial photographs of Newcastle and suburbs. A Special ‘Newcastle Sun’ Reader Service.

A Bird’s Eye View – Belmont, 1974.A Bird’s Eye View: A portfolio of outstanding aerial photographs of Newcastle and suburbs. A Special ‘Newcastle Sun’ Reader Service.

A Bird’s Eye View – Warners Bay, 1974.A Bird’s Eye View: A portfolio of outstanding aerial photographs of Newcastle and suburbs. A Special ‘Newcastle Sun’ Reader Service.

A Bird’s Eye View – Beresfield, 1974.A Bird’s Eye View: A portfolio of outstanding aerial photographs of Newcastle and suburbs. A Special ‘Newcastle Sun’ Reader Service.

A Bird’s Eye View – Speers Point, 1974.A Bird’s Eye View: A portfolio of outstanding aerial photographs of Newcastle and suburbs. A Special ‘Newcastle Sun’ Reader Service.

TweetFacebookA Bird’s Eye View: A Portfolio of outstanding aerial photographs of Newcastle and suburbs. A Special ‘Newcastle Sun’ Reader Service [1974].

These photos have been supplied by the University of Newcastle’sCulturalCollectionswith the help of the Vera Deacon Regional History Fund.

For more information visithttps://uoncc.wordpress上海m/vera-deacon-fund/and to donate to the fund visit:http://libguides.newcastle.edu.au/benefactors/new

The Big Picture reader photo competition 2016: finalists

by admin on 04/12/2018

Game Reserve in South Africa by Clifford Rosenberg. Finalist?of the Traveller Big Picture Competition, August 2016. * READER IMAGE NOT TO BE USED Photo: supplied Big Picture.
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How do you choose one winner from more than 2000 images submitted by passionate travellers?

Not easily, is the short answer.

But that’s what The Age photo editor Leigh Henningham, traveller上海m.au editorial producer Kylie McLaughlin, Sydney Morning Herald photographer Nick Moir and Clique Photo Club community manager Louisa Kirby were asked to do recently, spending a day poring over submitted images in the fifth Big Picture competition.

Henningham, a photographer with more than 30 years’ experience, says the overall standard of photography gets higher with every competition.

“People are no longer satisfied with just taking landscape photos but are trying to capture the character of a place by using the people and the elements in context of where they are,” Henningham says.

“The horse rider in Dubai is a great example of showing the scale, heat and enormity of the desert.”

Henningham, a keen traveller himself, says weather can play a big part in travel photography and was a feature of a number of the last-round finalists.

“The rain in Peru made for a fantastic photo as did the soft afternoon light on the lions in Africa.”

Take a look at the finalists in the gallery above. The winner will be announced on Saturday, September 3.

The overall winner and a partner or friend will travel to Indochina for a 13-Day Vietnam & Cambodia Highlights cruise and tour for two people in January 2017.

Enjoy the adventure through Vietnam and Cambodia, including a seven-night cruise along the Mekong River.

Visit World Heritage-listed Angkor Archaeological Park and Ho Chi Minh City and Phnom Penh.

The prize value is about $15,490 for two people in a Category C Standard Suite.

For the full itinerary, see aptouring上海m.au

To join Clique, see smh上海m.au/clique or theage上海m.au/clique.

Traveller’s Big Picture reader travel photo competition sponsors.

Jets coach Scott Miller has welcomed the return of skipper Nigel Boogaard from off-season ankle surgery

by admin on 04/12/2018

JETS coach Scott Miller has welcomed the return of skipper Nigel Boogaard from off-season ankle surgery.
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The 30-year-old central defender made his first appearance of Newcastle’s pre-season campaign in the 2-1 win againstHong Kong Premier League Champions Eastern SC in Shenzhen, playing the opening45 minutes before he was replaced at half-time by versatile Ben Kantarovski.

“It’s always nice to have a player of his [Boogaard’s] quality back in the squad, and furthermore a guy who speaks and communicates to the team like he does,’’ Miller said.

“He leads from the back and the organisation he provides the squad is very evident.”

Boogaard had surgery three months ago to repair ankle-ligament damage after nursing the injury through much of last season, his first in the A-League with Newcastle after stints with Central Coast and Adelaide.

He is expected toreceive further game time when Newcastle wrap up their tour of China with another friendly against one of Hong Kong’s top clubs, Kitchee SC, at the Bao’an Stadium on Friday, kicking off at6:30pm AEST.

After wins against Liaoning Whowins andEastern SC on tour, Miller has been satisfied with the progress his new-look squad are making.

“I think the performance [against Eastern SC]was very challenging but ultimately any challenge we undertake now we want to overcome it,” Miller said.

“We have recorded two wins in very difficult conditions against very good opposition [and] it’s vital now that we build that momentum.”

Newcastle’s win on Wednesday night was sealed by a penalty from former Melbourne Victory forward Andrew Nabbout.

BACK: Nigel Boogaard

“It’s nice to see the confidence in a player [Nabbout] stepping forward and actually taking his chance,” Miller said.

Meanwhile, veteran Danish defender Michael Jakobsen has signed a two-year contract with Melbourne City in Australia’s A-League.

The 30-year-old, who has played five internationals for Denmark, will join City next week from Danish Superliga side Esbjerg fB.

He haspreviously played for Lillestrom in Norway and for Almeria in the premier Spanish La Liga competition.

Jakobsen’s signature for the 2016-17 season follows the addition of Australian great Tim Cahill, Josh Rose, Neil Kilkenny and Manny Muscat to the City squad.

Puts spring into step

by admin on 04/12/2018

FISH OF THE WEEK: Keen angler Kaitlin Rose Webster wins the Jarvis Walker tacklebox and Tsunami lure pack for this monster flathead caught and released in Lake Macquarie recently.Exciting news for the crew aboard Curly III who ventured out of Nelson Bay last weekend to the Shelf and landed a 38kg yellowfin trolling lures.
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In closer to shore, it looks like we’re in for a bit of a blow tomorrow, with nor-west winds tipped to push 40kmh as we welcome in spring.

With that in mind, Brent “Hammer” Hancock, from Tackle World Port Stephens suggests celebrating Father’s Day on Saturday and go fishing on the Sunday.

“Failing that, fish the ocean rocks, the nor-west should flatten out the swell,” Brent said.

“Traditionally a westerly is a good time to fish the rocks and the great thing about the Port Stephens region is there’s so much coastline where you can find somewhere to take shelter.

“You’re going to catch plenty of luderick, bream and drummer and with abit of luck, maybe even a snapper.”

Guys have been catching some really nice fish out around the islands this week.

A German gentleman known simply to Hammer as Werner, boated an 8kg red.

“He’s pretty fit for an 84-year-old and a regular customer who loves his snapper fishing outside the bay and hiswhiting fishing in the bay,” Brent said.

Staple supplyRoss Duff from Salamander Bait and Tackle echoed the sentiments about plenty ofluderick coming off the breakwalls, with a few smaller kings venturing inside the bay to work the marina.

“Good squid in and around Shoal Bay, while Stockton and Fingal have been throwing up bream and whiting, salmon and tailor–the staples this time of year–with the odd jew being caught down around Tin City,” Duff said.

“Rocks have been producing lots of drummer, good bream and snapper around Boat Harbour and FishermansBay.

“Mal Farmer fished Broughton Island last week and got snapper up to 4kg.”

Transition timeSteve Whitely, from Freddys Fishing World at Broadmeadow is looking forward to a swift transition to spring.

Luderick continue to lurk along the breakwalls, Stevo said, and rocks from Lucy’s Wall down at Swansea, through Newcastle Harbour and Nobbys all the way up to Nelson Bay.

But he reckon’sthey’re starting to slow down and he’s hoping summer species come on line soon, literally.

“There’s still plent of tailor on the beach, with steady activiity up Stockton beach towards where the Sygna used to be.

“Guys have been getting small kings around the bridge at Swansea Bridge and there’s still plenty of monster flathead about in most local estuaries.

“On the freshwater front, we can expect to see the bass move in from the deeper water to the banks as the temperatures rise.”

Closure overSpeaking of freshwater, the annual three-month closure of the Australian Bass and Estuary Perch fisheries ended yesterday.

The annual zero bag limit for Australian Bass and Estuary Perch is in place from 1 June to 31 August in all rivers and estuaries, except in impoundments and in rivers above impoundments, to protect them during spawning.

Anglers can once again take these native species but remember the bag limits.

A total bag limit of two Australian Bass or Estuary Perch per person or a combination of both with a possession limit of four applies.

Only one fish is permitted to be over 35 centimetres in length when fishing in rivers.

Happy harbourLiam Marshall had a happy hunt last Sunday on Newcastle Harbour, landing a1.4kg salmon and a 1kg luderick.

Meanwhile, 15-year-old Mathew Bisegna confirmed word of consistent bream action off Honeysuckle Wharf in recent weeks with a nice catch.

Go fishingNewcastle has been added to the list of locations taking part in the Department of Primary Industry’sGone Fishing Day 2016 which will take place this year on October 16.

Gone Fishing Day is a celebration of recreational fishing, as a fun and healthy pastime for the entire family.

The inaugural event was held last year across six NSW locations and this year six new locations have been added, including Honeysuckle at Newcastle.

Fishing workshops, casting competitions, goodie bags with loads of free giveaways, activity marquees, fishing tips classes, touch tanks, and a kids activity corner are just some of the exciting fishing activities on offer.

DPI’s crab mascot,Snappy, will also be make an appearance to hand out lots of cool prizes.

For more infoCheck out theGone Fishing Day Facebook page.

Happy dayWith Father’s Day beckoning this Sunday, do dad and yourself a favour and take the pressure off this with a gift that keeps giving, or at least fishing.

Freddy’s has hard and soft tackleboxes walking out the door at 20 per cent off, IceKool eskies at a red hot 30 per cent off, and 10 to 30 per cent of Daiwa and Shimano reels.

Samsung Galaxy Note7 units explode, global shipments delayed

by admin on 04/12/2018

One of the Note7 units that reportedly exploded. Photo: KKJ.CNEvery now and again, Australia gets lucky in the world of technology: we get things first. Like with Samsung’s latest phone, the Galaxy Note7.
Shanghai night field

It hasn’t shipped in the United States yet, but Australians started getting their hands on it from August 19. South Koreans and Canadians have already got the phones as well. But there’s just one problem: it’s, uh, possibly exploding.

Reuters reported on Thursday morning that shipments for the Galaxy Note7 are being delayed following reports from users that the phone is exploding. A report appeared on Android Community last week, while Business Korea revealed a second case from South Korean social media.

“My boyfriend’s Galaxy Note7 exploded while charging at night. I woke up by the bang and the smell of smoke,” a South Korean user reportedly said.

It’s believed that faulty USB-C charging cables could be the culprit, although it could also happen when a non-official cable is connected to a micro-USB adaptor.

Gizmodo reported earlier this year about the dangers of crappy USB-C cables, and given that the PC and mobile industry is moving increasingly towards the USB-C standard its something users should be aware of. Ohh, a USB C cable basically just snapped off in my phone.. Buy decent USB C Cables, people!— Peter Wells (@peterwells) August 29, 2016

To their credit, Samsung has delayed further shipments of the Galaxy Note7 to conduct “additional tests … for product quality”. They didn’t specify anything beyond that, although it’s undoubtedly a pain in Samsung’s pocket. They already had to push back the Note7 launch in some countries due to demand, and investors won’t be thrilled about any potential delays due to faults.

Mind you, a delay is a hell of a lot better than literally being woken up by things that go bang in the night. celebrates video game culture with news, reviews and long form features.